Day Trading Success- The Key Is Survival

Most new traders tend to focus just about all their time and energy on finding nearly perfect “setups”, but trade setups, even very good ones, are *not* the key to successful trading. It’s the *way* you trade your setups that keeps your losses smaller than your gains. And this is the single most essential key to trading success. To me, the process of limiting losses is more than just money management…it is survival.

I can’t give you a list of mechanical survival rules that will take the place of experience and make you a successful trader overnight, but if you stick to the following principles in your trading, you’ll be on track. You’ll be doing just about the opposite of the crowd, and you’ll eventually learn to limit your losses. Limiting your losses is the only way I know to make money in this business.

The following guidelines will sound radical, but they have guided me in making my living from trading for many years. Continue reading “Day Trading Success- The Key Is Survival”

5 Day Trading Tips for Success

1. How to Treat Gap Openings

A gap up or gap down open is an emotional move, and it often will reverse course and turn in to “trap open”. Gaps that are less than 4 points on the SP Future tend to get filled in the same day, especially Tuesday through Thursday. Turns will occur within 20 to 40 minutes after the open. A trader must be on the lookout for a reversal as soon as early momentum is lost.

A gap into a good support /resistance zone is almost always a good “fade” – with stops no more than 1 point on other side of the support /resistance zone.

(A “fade” is simply entering a position opposite of the direction of the gap. If the market gapped down, a “fade” would be entering
a long position (buying) in to the selloff.) Continue reading “5 Day Trading Tips for Success”

The Difference Between Investing and Trading

Investing and Trading are not the same thing. The returns you seek, the length of time it takes to achieve those returns, the amount of risk one is prepared to take, and the commitment one can make to monitor the investments dictate the strategy of whether to invest or trade.

Investing

Investing is holding an asset for a longer term, expecting it to increase in value. The most common example is investing in equity mutual funds through a retirement plan. Many of these funds are held for years and are expected to show a substantial
appreciation over the long term.

You can also invest in individual stocks and hold them for 6 to 18 months or longer, sometimes much longer. This is referred to as the “buy and hold” strategy. Continue reading “The Difference Between Investing and Trading”